Increase Productivity

We all feel pressured to get more done in a day. And the more we do, the more we're expected to do. But being busy does not always translate to results. 

How we help

Our framework is based on four core areas that drive long-term productivity.

Often, when we don't feel productive, it's because we've let one (or more) of the fundamental pillars of productivity fall. To overcome this, we provide workshops and individual coaching which cover: organization, effectiveness, efficiency, and consistency. 

Be organized. Be effective. Be efficient. Be consistent.

Be organized.

Be organized.

How many times have you heard yourself say "I need to get organized"? It seems to be the first hurdle for people to overcome when trying to get things done. In this area we address:

  • Clearing your clutter (mental, physical and otherwise)
  • Deciding
  • Acting

Be effective.

Be effective.

This directly translates to results. Learn the key principles to help you weed through your tasks and determine your most valuable work to ensure you are focusing on the right things. Here we focus on:

  • Clarifying your goal
  • The 80/20 rule
  • Parkinson's Law

Be efficient.

Be efficient.

It's only natural for us to want to do things with the least amount of time and effort. While this is another important component, it must be stressed that doing something well doesn't make it important. This is why it is addressed after effectiveness—you need to be selective with the things you choose to be efficient about. Some of the key principles here are:

  • Batching
  • Process and workflow
  • Dealing with distractions

Be consistent.

Be consistent.

All of the previous components are only helpful to long-term success if we are consistent with them. And the best way to develop consistency is through habits. In our program, we explore the key principles for habit formation to ensure you maintain your productivity on an ongoing basis. There are three main areas that we address:

  • Habit formation
  • Overcoming procrastination
  • Use of process